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Backyard Collectives 2010: BYC Bend Style

September 30, 2010 by Serena Bishop

 

A few weeks ago we got to spend sometime in our "sort of" backyard -- Portland -- but this week we got to get our hands dirty for conservation in our actual backyard: Bend! We had forty employees from local member companies participate in trail building, garbage removal, and invasive tree removal in the Bull Springs area of Skyline Forest.

Big thanks to volunteers from Bend based Ruff Wear, Inc and Quick Feat International, as well as to our supporting sponsors: Ruff Wear, Inc., Stanley, a brand of PMI, and Clif Bar.

 

Volunteers got to mingle with representatives with local nonprofits Oregon Natural Desert Association, The Deschutes Land Trust, and 1000 Friends of Oregon, and learn more about the organizations and current projects.

 

Brad Chalfant, Executive Director of The Deschutes Land Trust, also gave a big thanks to all the volunteers:

“The Deschutes Land Trust has been working since 2005 to protect the big private timberlands on the east side of Oregon’s Cascades mountains. It’s been an uphill battle, since most people assume these lands are national forests and not at risk of development. The Conservation Alliance has helped us create a voice for these lands before they get broken up and sold off for development. Together we’ve made real progress and in the last year have seen the creation of Oregon’s first new state forest in 40 years. However, there’s a lot more work to do and the Conservation Alliance’s Backyard Collective just gave us a great new trail to help educate citizens, legislators and funders to create the momentum to make Skyline Forest a reality and permanently conserve another 66,500 acre of threatened forest.”

 Here's to more of us getting out and helping to take care of the places we love!

Update from Los Padres ForestWatch at 09/29/10 9:10 PM

September 29, 2010 by Los Padres ForestWatch
Carrizo Plain Defencing DayOCTOBER 16 - 17Miles and miles of barbed wire fence remains on the Carrizo Plain National Monument from years of former ranching. These relic fences act as barriers to the movement of pronghorn antelope, inhibiting their escape from predators and contributing to their decline. ForestWatch is collecting a group of volunteers dedicated to taking down a couple miles - can you join us? Email Conservation Coordinator Suzanne Feldman... Read More

Update from Los Padres ForestWatch at 09/29/10 9:12 PM

September 29, 2010 by Los Padres ForestWatch
Wild and Scenic Environmental Film FestivalOCTOBER 22ForestWatch is bringing the third Wild and Scenic Environmental Film Festival to San Luis Obispo, CA - an eagerly anticipated annual event drawing its audience from all along the Central Coast. The film festival showcases inspirational and exciting films, an environmental fair, raffles, refreshments, and special guests. Purchase tickets at www.LPFW.org... Read More

Update from Los Padres ForestWatch at 09/29/10 9:14 PM

September 29, 2010 by Los Padres ForestWatch
Fraizer Mountain Clean and CampNovember 13 - 14Say goodbye to Daylight Savings Time in the beautiful Los Padres National Forest. ForestWatch is planning an overnight microtrash collection event at Fraizer Mountain. Help remove microtrash, ingestion of which is a leading contributor to the decline of teh California condor! Email Conservation Coordinator Suzanne Feldman... Read More

Update from Los Padres ForestWatch at 09/29/10 9:18 PM

September 29, 2010 by Los Padres ForestWatch
Carrizo Plain Defencing DayOCTOBER 16 - 17Miles and miles of barbed wire fences remain on the Carrizo Plain National Monument from years of former ranching. These relic fences act as barriers to the movement of proghorn antelope, inhibiting their escape from predators and contributing to their decline. ForestWatch is collecting a group of volunteers dedicated to taking down a couple miles - will you join us? Email Conservation Coordinator Suzanne Feldman at Suzanne@LPFW.org... Read More

Arctic Wilderness Review Raises Hopes, Alarms

September 29, 2010 by Serena Bishop

 

From the PEW Environment Group via E&E Daily: 

Environmental groups are crowing while Alaska's congressional delegation is condemning the Obama administration's announcement Monday that it will consider proposing new wilderness designations within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Nearly half of ANWR has already been declared wilderness, a designation that carries strict restrictions on human activities to protect high conservation-value lands. The Interior Department now will consider recommending designations on the rest of the area — including land above oil reserves on Alaska's coastal plain.

Interior does not have the power to create any new wilderness areas. That can only be done through an act of Congress. Instead, Interior can recommend Congress consider certain lands for the designation, said Bruce Woods, an Alaska office spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Interior agency conducting the review.

"We're a long way from that," Woods said.

But they are too close for comfort for Alaska Sens. Lisa Murkowski (R) and Mark Begich (D), who favor developing the refuge's oil reserves. They took turns ripping the administration's plans this week.

Murkowski called the reviews a "blatant political move by the administration" in an Associated Press interview, and Begich said they were "a colossal waste of limited resources."

"We should use those resources to develop the enormous oil and gas reserves believed to be beneath the coastal plain," Begich said...

But while the lawmakers fume, environmental groups are heralding the move as a step in the right direction.

"We are confident that because the [ANWR] has pre-eminent wilderness values ... this process will lead to a strong wilderness recommendation to the U.S. Congress," said Cindy Shogan, executive director of the Alaska Wilderness League.

The group pushed the administration to propose wilderness on the coastal plain, saying it was the heart of the ecosystem ANWR was set up to protect. "The arctic refuge is one of the last true wilderness areas left in the United States," Shogan said. "Some places are just too special to sacrifice to oil and gas development."

Woods said both sides may be getting ahead of themselves...

"Regardless of what we do and what anyone does, only Congress can designate wilderness and only Congress can open it to oil and gas drilling."

The administration's decision to consider suggesting new wilderness does not necessarily mean it intends to do so, Woods said.

Read the rest of the story... 

Grantee Weekly Grind: Arctic Wilderness Review Raises Hopes, Alarms

September 28, 2010 by Serena Bishop
 
From the PEW Environment Group via E&E Daily: 
 

Environmental groups are crowing while Alaska's congressional delegation is condemning the Obama administration's announcement Monday that it will consider proposing new wilderness designations within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Nearly half of ANWR has already been declared wilderness, a designation that carries strict restrictions on human activities to protect high conservation-value lands. The Interior Department now will consider recommending designations on the rest of the area -- including land above oil reserves on Alaska's coastal plain.

Interior does not have the power to create any new wilderness areas. That can only be done through an act of Congress. Instead, Interior can recommend Congress consider certain lands for the designation, said Bruce Woods, an Alaska office spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Interior agency conducting the review.

"We're a long way from that," Woods said.

But they are too close for comfort for Alaska Sens. Lisa Murkowski (R) and Mark Begich (D), who favor developing the refuge's oil reserves. They took turns ripping the administration's plans this week.

Murkowski called the reviews a "blatant political move by the administration" in an Associated Press interview, and Begich said they were "a colossal waste of limited resources."

"We should use those resources to develop the enormous oil and gas reserves believed to be beneath the coastal plain," Begich said...

But while the lawmakers fume, environmental groups are heralding the move as a step in the right direction.

"We are confident that because the [ANWR] has pre-eminent wilderness values ... this process will lead to a strong wilderness recommendation to the U.S. Congress," said Cindy Shogan, executive director of the Alaska Wilderness League.

The group pushed the administration to propose wilderness on the coastal plain, saying it was the heart of the ecosystem ANWR was set up to protect. "The arctic refuge is one of the last true wilderness areas left in the United States," Shogan said. "Some places are just too special to sacrifice to oil and gas development."

Woods said both sides may be getting ahead of themselves...

"Regardless of what we do and what anyone does, only Congress can designate wilderness and only Congress can open it to oil and gas drilling."

The administration's decision to consider suggesting new wilderness does not necessarily mean it intends to do so, Woods said...

Read the rest of the story... 

Update from Oregon Wild at 09/27/10 7:13 PM

September 27, 2010 by Oregon Wild
This week is National Wilderness Week and we're back in D.C. building support for two key pieces of legislation that are THIS close to passing into law. Erik Fernandez, our Wilderness Coordinator is urging Congress to pass Wilderness protections for the Devil's Staircase. This 30,000-acre area in the Oregon Coast Range is rugged, blanketed in old-growth forests, and hosts one of the most mesmerizing, hard-to-reach waterfalls in Oregon. Erik is also touting the Molalla River and a 20-mile stretch of the waterway that should be designated as Wild & Scenic. Aside from being a recreational haven and a refuge for salmon and steelhead, the Molalla provides clean drinking water to the cities of Canby and Molalla. We're hoping these bills can be wrapped into the larger public lands omnibus legislation and get the seal of approval from Congress before the elections!... Read More

Stand Tall for the Rogue

September 27, 2010 by Oregon Wild
Time is running out for the Wild Rogue River. We can't let this opportunity to protect 58,000 acres of Wilderness along Oregon's iconic whitewater river pass us by.Watch this video and let Congress know to protect the Wild Rogue this year!http://savethewildrogue.org/... Read More

Conservation Stories: REI Encourages Members to Volunteer for National Public Lands Day

September 23, 2010 by Serena Bishop

 

The work at Conservation Alliance wouldn't be possible without all of our outdoor industry brand members. But a lot of them aren't only involved with Conservation Alliance; many of our member brands are committed to a diverse variety of environmental causes. Every Thursday we'll be featuring a cross-post from one of our member companies to highlight the causes that they're active in. Today we're featuring a post from REI's blog about getting out and volunteering for this Saturday's National Public Lands Day.

***

Our nation’s public lands are the places where most of us go to enjoy the outdoors. Whether we visit our neighborhood green space or a national park, public lands give us a chance to enjoy fresh air wherever we live or travel.

I rely on public lands for all the best places to use my beloved outdoor gear, and you probably do, too. That’s why I’m hoping you and your friends will join one of the events of National Public Lands Day on Saturday, Sepetember 25.

National Public Lands Day (NPLD) is our nation’s largest hands-on volunteer effort to improve and enhance the lands that we all enjoy. Not sure what qualifies as “public land?” Public lands include municipal, county, regional, state and national parks as well as US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management lands. Like I said, pretty much everywhere that we go to get outside.

I’m also pleased to point out that REI supports hundreds of local organizations through our grants program and local store partnerships that engage volunteers in restoring and sustaining public lands all year long.

If you’re a member of the REI co-op, you can be proud to be playing a part in helping to take care of these places. However, we’d love it if you would come out and join us in playing an active role in stewarding public lands. Find your local store page and check the classes and events section to see if they’re hosting or promoting an NPLD event in your community.

You can also find events by entering your state or zip code on the National Public Lands Day website. REI’s partnership with VolunteerMatch is yet another way to search for local volunteer stewardship events on public lands in your community. Try it out—it feels great to get involved.

As an added incentive to get out and spend some time on your public lands this weekend, The National Parks will be fee-free on Saturday and Sunday.

Update from Washington Climbers Coalition at 09/22/10 1:10 AM

September 22, 2010 by Washington Climbers Coalition

Photo: Ben Gilkison

The Washington Climbers Coalition had a dedication ceremony and community event to celebrate the recent acqusition of the Lower Town Wall. The community event attracted over 100 people for food and a slide show by Colin Haley. You can read about the dedication of the property here: http://www.seattlepi.com/local/426994_INDEX19.html As for our fund raising, we are only about 40k short of our ultimate goal of 300k.... Read More

Grantee Weekly Grind: Natural Gas Drilling Threatens New York City Water Supply and Beyond...

September 21, 2010 by Serena Bishop

The New York City watershed and Delaware River Basin combined provides water for more than 15,600,000 people. It's the largest unfiltered water source in the world. And the natural gas industry has leased hundreds of thousands of acres within the watershed and the river basin for energy development. That could mean 50,000 gas wells in the combined watershed area. 

As of spring 2010, there has been no drilling, but that could change any day now... Conservation Alliance grantee Adirondack Mountain Club is working to protect Allegheny State Park from proposed hydro-fracking mining by purchasing sub-surface mineral rights by the state, or by designating the area a Park Preserve. But the problem goes deeper than that. The potential drilling threatens the entire region and many others across the country, as exposed by the documentary Gasland...

 Watch the trailer:

"The largest domestic natural gas drilling boom in history has swept across the United States. The Halliburton-developed drilling technology of "fracking" or hydraulic fracturing has unlocked a "Saudia Arabia of natural gas" just beneath us. But is fracking safe? When filmmaker Josh Fox is asked to lease his land for drilling, he embarks on a cross-country odyssey uncovering a trail of secrets, lies and contamination. A recently drilled nearby Pennsylvania town reports that residents are able to light their drinking water on fire. This is just one of the many absurd and astonishing revelations of a new country called GASLAND. Part verite travelogue, part expose, part mystery, part bluegrass banjo meltdown, part showdown."

Take Action: Tell your Senators and Representatives to support the FRAC Act...

http://gaslandthemovie.com/take-action/ 

Backyard Collectives 2010: Portland Hosts Largest BYC Yet!

September 16, 2010 by Serena Bishop

 

Another week, another Backyard Collective... this time right in our own backyard: Portland! More than 235 employees from eight Conservation Alliance member companies -- Columbia Sportswear; KEEN; Nau; Horny Toad/Lizard Lounge; The North Face; REI; Under Solen Media; and Ben Moon Photography -- participated in trail restoration, invasive weed removal, and other projects in Forest Park, Sellwood Park, and along Johnson Creek. In fact, that made the Portland 2010 Backyard Collective the biggest one yet! Columbia loaded three huge busses with 200 employees!

 

 

With over 235 employees showing up, that means we logged over 840 volunteer hours.. you can imagine how much ivy that equals! We also had a lively “environmental fair” that provided several of our grantee conservation organizations the opportunity to share information about their work with everyone that came out.  



Thanks to Forest Park Conservancy and their trail crew for keeping us all in line and hard at work!

Polar Bear Ad: Good, or Just More Greenwashing?

September 15, 2010 by Serena Bishop

 

Earlier this month, Nissan debuted "Polar Bear," a video advertisement for the new Nissan LEAF — a zero-emission, 100-percent electric vehicle. In this story, a sad polar bear watches its Arctic home melt away and journeys from the icy north through forests, highways and over bridges to the big city and then to the suburbs, where the animal finds someone who is trying to help — the owner of an all-electric Nissan LEAF.

Thanks to the Western Environmental Law Center for tipping us off to this video. What do you think? Is Nissan on the right track here, or is it just more greenwashing?

 

 

Take Action to Celebrate National Wilderness Month!

September 09, 2010 by Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance
President Obama signed a Presidential Proclamation last week which recognized September as “National Wilderness Month.”  Invoking the “majesty of our Nation’s wilderness” and a rich legacy of past wilderness legislation, the president rightly recognized that “we must ensure that future generations can experience the tranquility and grandeur of America’s natural places.”  Please send him a message asking him to commemorate National Wilderness Month by giving long-deserved protection to wilderness-quality lands in Utah! The Dirty Devil proposed wilderness is still under threat by policies kept in place from the Bush administration.  Photo copyright Ray Bloxham/SUWA. Even as President Obama's proclamation emphasized the need to protect the natural heritage of future generations, over at the Department of Interior, Secretary Ken Salazar has kept in place highly destructive policies initiated by the Bush administration which threaten the pristine natural beauty, quiet and solitude of worthy wilderness-quality lands throughout the West. Here’s what Secretary Salazar... Read More

Conservation Stories: Help Select The Next Conservation Alliance Grantees, Win prAna Prize Pack!

September 09, 2010 by Serena Bishop

 

The work at Conservation Alliance wouldn't be possible without all of our outdoor industry brand members. But a lot of them aren't only involved with Conservation Alliance; many of our member brands are committed to a diverse variety of environmental causes. Every Thursday we'll be featuring a cross-post from one of our member companies to highlight the causes that they're active in. Today we're pulling a request from the prAna Facebook page that asks for your help in deciding which groups should get Conservation Alliance grants this year!

***

Nicole Bassett here, prAna Sustainability Director, and I wanted to include you in a really wonderful opportunity.

The Conservation Alliance is a group of outdoor industry companies that disburses its collective annual membership dues to grassroots environmental organizations.

Funding is directed to community-based campaigns to protect threatened wild habitat, preferably where outdoor enthusiasts recreate. As a member of the Conservation Alliance, prAna is asked twice yearly to vote for the organizations that will receive grant money.

This year we thought it would be great to hear from you, our supporters, on who you would like prAna to vote for. Please take a few moments to review the 24 grants nominees and vote for your top 10 groups and campaigns.

Thank you in advance for your thoughts as we support wilderness areas. All participants will be entered into a draw for a prAna prize pack! Click here to take the survey.

DEADLINE: Please complete your survey before Wednesday September 15, 2010 at 12 noon Pacific Standard Time

Grantee Weekly Grind: World's Premiere Photographers Join Forces to Protect British Columbia's Great Bear Rainforest

September 07, 2010 by Serena Bishop

Photo courtesy Ian McAllister, iLCP

Conservation Alliance grantee Pacific Wild has teamed up with the iLCP, a group of internationally renowned photographers, to take part in a RAVE (Rapid Assessment Visual Expedition) in British Columbia's Great Bear Rainforest. Home to white spirit bears, ancient forests, and stunning marine biodiversity, it is one of the planet's most priceless treasures, but overseas oil interests wanting access to western Canada's tar sands, the second largest known oil reserves in the world, have put the region in threat, prompting the action of conservation groups and the iLCP. Please follow along on the iLCP blog, on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

From iLCP's blog:

Just like in many creative industries, the photography business is a competitive one. Why then, would some of the world's premiere photographers converge in the wilds of British Columbia's Great Bear Rainforest? To save one of the planet's most priceless treasures. Photographers including Paul Nicklen, Florian Schultz, Daniel Beltra, Jack Dykinga, Tom Peschak and Cristina Mittermeier will take part in the iLCP's RAVE (Rapid Assessment Visual Expedition) of the area and tell the story of this incredible place and the people working to save it.


"The Great Bear Rainforest is an environmental treasure, and the international exposure that the iLCP is capable of generating will undoubtedly prove a clarion call for its protection," said Ian McAllister, Conservation Director for B.C. based Pacific Wild and recently nominated Associate of the iLCP. "We have everything to lose and very little to gain by allowing oil tankers on our coast."

 

Overseas oil interests want access to western Canada's tar sands — the second largest known oil reserves in the world — and have proposed the construction of a massive pipeline through the rain forest to get it.

 

Photo courtesy Cristina Mittermeier, iLCP

Home to white spirit bears, ancient forests, and stunning marine biodiversity, iLCP's team of photographers will showcase the immense ecological importance of western Canada's threatened rain forest and marine environment. The images and stories from the expedition members will be shared with international media and partner organizations and will be featured in a traveling exhibition across North America and Europe.

Photo courtesy Ian McAllister, iLCP

Enbridge Inc., the world's largest pipeline construction company (and the same one responsible for Michigan's oil spill) has proposed to open export markets for tar sands oil outside the United States — most notably China.

 

So, how do you go about that? Build a 1,200 km pipeline from Alberta's tar sands and British Columbia's north Pacific coast over more than 1,000 streams and rivers — including some of the world's largest salmon producing watersheds — and introduce super oil tankers (revoking an existing moratorium on large ships) to transport oil through the pristine waters of the Great Bear Rainforest.

"We support this effort to document the lands and seas of our traditional territory," states Ernie Hill Jr., Sn'axeed, Gitga'at Hereditary Eagle Chief. The indigenous First Nations who call this area home unanimously oppose this project. "Enbridge's pipeline and oil tanker proposal will destroy our way of life and we must do everything possible to show what we stand to lose."

 

Learn more about the Great Bear Rainforest RAVE.

 

Update from Pacific Wild at 09/06/10 5:21 PM

September 06, 2010 by Pacific Wild
Pacific Wild partners with the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) to showcase the Great Bear Rainforest. R.A.V.E - Rapid Assessment Visual Expedition - launches in the wake of Enbridge proposal to ship crude oil through the Great Bear Rainforest. Over a two week period, a team of  top-level photojournalists chosen by the ILCP will document the Great Bear Rainforest in photos, video, audio, and words with a special focus on the marine world. iLCP and Pacific Wild will use the collected media to generate outreach initiatives and to flood major media organizations with stories of BC’s intent to lift the moratorium on tanker traffic. QUICK LINKS DISPATCHES FROM THE RAVE PRESS RELEASE ILCP PHOTOGRAPHERS RAVE PARTNERS... Read More

Pipe Up Against Enbridge!

September 06, 2010 by Pacific Wild
Learn more about Enbridge's plan to build a pipeline from Alberta's tar sands to the Great Bear Rainforest, bringing bulk crude oil tankers to B.C.'s coast for the first time.  www.pacificwild.org Take Action-pipeupagainstenbridge.org, www.pacificwild.org ... Read More

Backyard Collectives 2010: Bringing Companies and Causes Together in Denver

September 03, 2010 by Serena Bishop

 

It's always important for Conservation Alliance to maintain the connections between our member companies and grantees, and what's one of the best ways to do that? Bringing them all together for a day of volunteering where they can "get their hands dirty" for conservation! Which is why last week, we brought Colorado-area member companies and grantees together and descended upon Roxborough State Park for this year's fifth Backyard Collective!


 

We had 75+ volunteers from member companies Osprey Packs, Sierra Designs, Kelty, Wenzel, Teko Socks, Backpackers Pantry, Leisure Trends Group, Great Plains Mountain Stuff, Serac Adventure Films, Burts Bees, IMBA, and Keen Footwear, as well as CA grantees Colorado Environmental Coalition, Colorado Mountain Club, Access Fund, and Colorado 14ers, who all got to take part in pulling invasive plant species, cleaning up Sundance Ranch and working on trail maintenance. All helped by libations from New Belgium of course.

 

A big thanks to the Denver Backyard Collective sponsors: Osprey, Sierra Designs/Kelty/Wenzel, Teko Socks, Leisure Trends, and Backpackers Pantry. Also a huge thank you to Roxborough State Park and Colorado State Parks, their great staff and wonderful volunteers.

 

Now we're amping up for the next Backyard Collectives, to be held Friday September 10, 2010 in Portland, OR -- check back soon for pictures and reports from that one as well!

Conservation Stories: Nemo Equipment Asks for Your Support on Land and Water Conservation Fund

September 02, 2010 by Serena Bishop

 

 

 

The work at Conservation Alliance wouldn't be possible without all of our outdoor industry brand members. But a lot of them aren't only involved with Conservation Alliance; many of our member brands are committed to a diverse variety of environmental causes. Every Thursday we'll be featuring a cross-post from one of our member companies to highlight the causes that they're active in. A little over a month ago we encouraged you to take action to support the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Last week Kate over at member company Nemo Equipment wrote a great post outlining why outdoor enthusiasts should voice their support for this legislation, so we figured we'd post it for today's Conservation Stories. We hope it inspires you to voice your support!

***

The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was established by Congress in 1964 to help fund state and local conservation efforts and to protect national parks, forests and wilderness areas. Funding comes from offshore oil and gas leases.

Over its 46-year history, LWCF has helped state agencies and local communities acquire nearly seven million acres of land and has underwritten the development of more than 37,000 state and local park and recreation projects. Federal LWCF project sites include popular recreational areas like Harper's Ferry, West Virginia, California's Big Sur Coast, and the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem in Montana. Stateside LWCF project sites include New York City's Central Park, Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, and Custer State Park in South Dakota, as well as thousands of local playgrounds, soccer fields, and baseball diamonds.

LWCF is authorized at $900 million annually; a level that has been met only twice during the program's 46 years. The program is divided into State grants and Federal acquisition funds. In FY 2005, the federal acquisition pot received $166 million and the state grants program received $92.5 million for a total of $258.5 million. In FY 2006 the federal pot received $114.5 and the state grants received $30 million. FY 2007 a total of only $138 million was received between the two.

Efforts are now underway in Congress to ensure full funding for the LWCF and your voice is an important part of making full funding a reality. If you value open spaces to recreate in, contact your senators today. Legislation that would fully fund LWCF for five years was passed by the House as a part of the gulf oil spill reform package. Companion legislation will be considered on the floor of the Senate in the coming months. NEMO has signed their letter of support, we hope you'll voice your support, too. ~Kate

Grantee Weekly Grind: President Obama Names September National Wilderness Month

September 01, 2010 by Serena Bishop

 

President Obama announced that he has designated September National Wilderness Month.‎ In his proclamation he said:

"Together, we must ensure that future generations can experience the tranquility and grandeur of America's natural places. As we resolve to meet this responsibility, let us also reflect on the ways in which our lives have been enriched by the gift of the American wilderness."

Happy September! Now get out and enjoy some wilderness!!!

Photo via