News

MOUNTAIN HARDWEAR WAREHOUSE SALE AGAIN BENEFITS THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE

Mountain Hardwear raised $5,140 for The Conservation Alliance at its Fall 2007 warehouse sale. The company gave a 10 percent discount and a t-shirt to any customer that made a $20 donation to The Conservation Alliance. The contribution will help the organization in its ongoing efforts to protect wild places where outdoor customers recreate.

The November event was the fourth time Mountain Hardwear has integrated a fundraising promotion into the sale. In total, the three events have raised more than $15,000 for The Conservation Alliance.

“Once again, Mountain Hardwear has found a creative way to support our efforts,” said John Sterling, Executive Director of the Alliance. “By including The Conservation Alliance in the company’s Factory Sale, Mountain Hardwear has not only raised much-needed funds, but also provided valuable visibility for our efforts to protect North America’s last wild places.”

James Bottoms, Mountain Hardwear’s Director of Operations, conceived the fundraising idea in 2006, and colleague Taylor Shoop developed the t-shirt concept.

“We are excited to support The Conservation Alliance through our Factory Sale,” said Bottoms. “It reminds us and our customers that there is more to our business than product.”

Mountain Hardwear is a long-time Conservation Alliance member with a strong commitment to conservation. The company supports the Alliance through its Gives Back program (http://www.mountainhardwear.com/GivesBack.aspx). In addition to contributing annual dues the Alliance’s grant fund, the company has helped promote environmental causes important to them. Mountain Hardwear regularly features information about conservation efforts in catalogs, and encourages employees to be active in these campaigns.

“Mountain Hardwear’s added support comes at an important time for The Conservation Alliance,” added Sterling. “We have some great opportunities to protect our wildlands and rivers, and every extra donation enables us to better seize those opportunities.”

DR. JOHN FRANCIS TO SPEAK AT CONSERVATION ALLIANCE BREAKFAST

The Conservation Alliance Breakfast at the upcoming Outdoor Retailer Show will feature guest speaker Dr. John Francis, an inspiring speaker and renowned expert on oil spill prevention.

Dr. Francis is known the world over as the Planetwalker. In 1971, he witnessed an oil spill in San Francisco Bay. The effects of the spill compelled Francis to stop using motorized vehicles. Several months later, he took a vow of silence. His non-motorized lifestyle lasted 22 years, and the silence 17. During that time John walked across the United States earning a B.A at Southern Oregon State College, an M.S. in Environmental Studies at the University of Montana and a Ph.D. in land resources at the University of Wisconsin. He later sailed and walked through the Caribbean and then walked the length of South America.

“We are fortunate that Dr. Francis will share his story with us in January,” said John Sterling, Conservation Alliance Executive Director. “I know his message of how one person can make a difference will resonate with our audience.”

Dr. Francis will speak about his journey, his unique perspective on environment, and how we each can make a difference in our world. Dr. Francis is the author of Planetwalker: How to Change Your World One Step at A Time.

In addition to Dr. Francis’ talk, The Conservation Alliance Breakfast will feature an update on recent Alliance grantees and conservation successes funded by the Alliance. The Conservation Alliance Breakfast is open to the public. For complete information, see http://conservationalliance.com/articles.

CONSERVATION ALLIANCE ADDS STAFF

 

Responding to the demands of a growing membership, The Conservation Alliance has added a second full-time staff position. Krissy Moehl started in early November as the Alliance’s new Program Associate. She will focus her time on communications, marketing, and membership services.

Moehl has worked in marketing positions in the outdoor industry for more than six years, first with Montrail and more recently with Nathan.

“Krissy brings a strong marketing and communications background to our small team,” said John Sterling, Conservation Alliance Executive Director. “She will lead our effort to help our growing membership get the most out of their participation in the Alliance.”

The Conservation Alliance has doubled its membership over the past three years, placing more demands on staff to meet member needs. In 2008, the Alliance will offer members a new marketing toolkit designed to help them better communicate their involvement in the Alliance’s work to protect North America’s wild lands and rivers.

“I am excited for the opportunity to remain close the outdoor industry in this new capacity.  Working with the Conservation Alliance brings new challenge, avenues for exploration and growth.  I look forward to engaging our members and serving the Board of Directors.”  Moehl said of her new position.

In addition to her marketing background, Moehl is a world-class ultrarunner and an endurance ambassador for Patagonia, Inc.

“Conservation work can take time and patience,” said Sterling. “We’re excited to have an endurance specialist on our team.”

EASTERN MOUNTAIN SPORTS SALE AGAIN BENEFITS THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE

Eastern Mountain Sports raised $15,000 for The Conservation Alliance during the retailer’s Upgrade Your Gear sale event held October 18-21. The company held a similar event in April, bringing the total contribution to more than $30,000 between the two events.

The company pledged to share 1 percent of sales equally between the Alliance and The Access Fund. Each of the 68 Eastern Mountain Sports stores participated in the promotion, raising a total of $30,000, half of which will go to the Alliance’s effort to preserve North America’s wildlands and rivers for their habitat and recreational values.

“Eastern Mountain Sports customers are passionate about conserving their outdoor playground and appreciate our continued support for wildland conservation,” said Will Manzer, President and CEO of Eastern Mountain Sports. “The Conservation Alliance has a long history of supporting effective conservation initiatives, and we’re pleased that our sale event continues to benefit their efforts.”

An active member of The Conservation Alliance since 1997, Eastern Mountain Sports wanted to go beyond annual membership dues to demonstrate a greater commitment to conservation.

“For the second time this year, Eastern Mountain Sports has drawn their customers into our conservation efforts,” said John Sterling, Executive Director of The Conservation Alliance. “The sale generated valuable funds for the Alliance, and added value to customers’ shopping experience.”

The Conservation Alliance has contributed more than $600,000 to conservation projects in the Northeastern US, where most Eastern Mountain Sports stores are located.

CONSERVATION ALLIANCE MEMBERS VOICE SUPPORT FOR COLORADO WILDERNESS

 A group of four Conservation Alliance members traveled to Washington DC to talk to members of Congress about the importance of securing new Wilderness designations in Rocky Mountain National Park and elsewhere in Colorado.

Representatives from Chaco, GoLite, Outdoor Industry Association, and The Conservation Alliance spent two days in meetings with 14 Congressional offices to show support for legislation that would protect 250,000 acres of federal land within the iconic park as Wilderness. The group also voiced support for efforts to protect 20,000 acres along the Arkansas River in central Colorado, and 150,000 acres in the Dominguez Canyon region of western Colorado.

The Conservation Alliance organized the trip in conjunction with the Colorado Environmental Coalition (CEC) (www.ourcolorado.org) a recent Conservation Alliance grant recipient.

“When possible, we like to supplement our financial support with on-the-ground advocacy,” said John Sterling, Conservation Alliance Executive Director. “Our member companies recognize the value of protecting wild places for non-motorized use.”

Conservationists in Colorado have been working for more than 30 years to protect Rocky Mountain National Park as Wilderness. More recent campaigns have grown around protecting Brown’s and Dominguez Canyons.

“Rocky Mountain National Park is an iconic wildland that deserves the highest level of federal protection,” said Sterling.

The Conservation Alliance has 25 member companies based in Colorado, most of which have endorsed protection for these three areas. “Colorado is a mecca for the outdoor industry, and our members there want to leave a lasting legacy in the state,” Sterling said.

Trip participants included Brian Scranton (Chaco), Colin True (GoLite), Amy Roberts (Outdoor Industry Association), and Sterling.

CONSERVATION ALLIANCE AWARDS $400,000 IN GRANTS TO 17 ORGANIZATIONS

The Conservation Alliance sent checks totaling $400,000 to 17 organizations working to protect wild places throughout North America. The donations marked the Alliance’s final disbursal of funding for 2007, and represent the largest single funding round in the organization’s history. The Alliance has invested $800,000 in conservation projects in 2007, and this round brings total giving to $6 million since the organization’s founding in 1989

By a vote of the group’s 147 member companies, The Conservation Alliance made donations to 17 grassroots conservation organizations as follows:

Organization (Location)     Amount
1. Adirondack Mountain Club (Lake George, NY)   $20,000
2. Alaska Wilderness League (Washington, DC)    $30,000
3. Appalachian Trail Conservancy (Harpers Ferry, WV)  $30,000
4. California Trout (San Francisco, CA)    $15,000
5. Clayoquot Solutions Steering Committee (Vancouver, BC) $20,000
6. Colorado Environmental Coalition (Denver, CO)  $30,000
7. Friends of Allegheny Wilderness (Warren, PA)   $25,000  
8. Friends of the River (Sacramento, CA)   $20,000
9. Klamath Siskiyou Wildlands Center (Ashland, OR)  $20,000
10. Montana Wilderness Association (Helena, MT)  $30,000
11. Nevada Wilderness Project (Reno, NV)   $20,000
12. Oregon Wild (Portland, OR)    $30,000
13. Save Our Wild Salmon (Seattle, WA)   $30,000
14. Southern Appalachian Biodiversity Project (Asheville, NC) $20,000
15. The Wilderness Society of Idaho (Boise, ID)   $15,000
16. Utah Rivers Council (Salt Lake City, UT)   $30,000
17. Western Colorado Congress (Grand Junction, CO)  $15,000
      Total $400,000

“With these grants, outdoor industry companies have made an important investment in their future,” said John Sterling, Executive Director of The Conservation Alliance. “Protected wild places are good for outdoor business.”

This round of grant recipients reflects the geographic distribution of Conservation Alliance members. Conservation Alliance funds will support efforts to: secure new wilderness designations in Pennsylvania, Colorado, Nevada, Montana, Oregon, and Idaho; protect wild rivers in California, Utah and Oregon; improve off-road vehicle regulations in the Adirondacks; establish a new National Scenic Area in North Carolina; and protect spectacular ancient forests in Canada.

“Our members continue to identify an amazing array of conservation projects,” said Sterling.

This is the final grant disbursement The Conservation Alliance will make in 2007, bringing the year’s total to $800,000. The Alliance also surpassed $6 million in total giving since founding in 1989.

“For nearly 20 years, our member companies have demonstrated their commitment to protecting wild lands and rivers for their recreation and habitat values,” said Sterling. “We will continue to show that commitment.”

BRIEF OVERVIEW OF GRANTS

1. Adirondack Mountain Club (Lake George, NY): Save the Trails Campaign to limit the expansion of snowmobile and ATV use on hiking trails in the Adirondack Forest Preserve.
2. Alaska Wilderness League (Washington, DC): Protect America’s Arctic Campaign to protect wildlands in America’s Arctic from oil development.
3. Appalachian Trail Conservancy (Harpers Ferry, WV): Rocky Fork Tract Acquisition to purchase a pristine 10,000-acre wildland adjacent to Wilderness and roadless areas in Tennessee.
4. California Trout (San Francisco, CA): Klamath Dam Removal Campaign to restore salmon poplulations by removing four dams on the Klamath River in Northern California.
5. Clayoquot Solutions Steering Committee (Vancouver, BC): Ancient Rainforest Campaign to protect 148,000 acres of rainforest in Clayoquot Sound, British Columbia.
6.  Colorado Environmental Coalition (Denver, CO): Colorado Wilderness Campaign to protect wildlands in Rocky Mountain National Park, Brown’s Canyon, and the Lower Gunnison River area.
7. Friends of Allegheny Wilderness (Warren, PA): Pennsylvania Wilderness Campaign to secure Wilderness protection for 55,000 acres in Pennsylvania’s Allegheny National Forest.
8. Friends of the River (Sacramento, CA): California Wild Rivers Campaign to protect more than 300 miles of rivers and streams in California.
9. Klamath Siskiyou Wildlands Center (Ashland, OR): Wild Rogue Campaign to protect 103 miles of river and 58,000 acres of Wilderness in Oregon’s Rogue River watershed.
10. Montana Wilderness Association (Helena, MT): Beaverhead-Deerlodge Wilderness Campaign to permanently protect 570,000 acres of public land in Montana.
11. Nevada Wilderness Project (Reno, NV): Desert National Wildlife Refuge Campaign to secure Wilderness protection for Nevada’s Desert National Wildlife Refuge.
12. Oregon Wild (Portland, OR): Mt. Hood Wilderness Campaign to protect 128,000 acres of wildlands and 81 miles of rivers on Oregon’s Mt. Hood.
13. Save Our Wild Salmon (Seattle, WA): Columbia and Snake Rivers Campaign to restore wild salmon populations in the Columbia Basin by removing four dams on Idaho’s lower Snake River.
14. Southern Appalachian Biodiversity Project (Asheville, NC): Grandfather National Scenic Area Campaign to permanently protect 25,000 acres in North Carolina’s Pisgah National Forest.
15. The Wilderness Society-Idaho (Boise, ID): Owyhee Initiative Campaign to protect 500,000 acres of Wilderness and 300 miles of rivers in Idaho’s Owyhee Canyonlands.
16. Utah Rivers Council (Salt Lake City, UT): Wild and Scenic Rivers Utah Campaign to protect dozens of rivers in Utah under the federal Wild and Scenic Rivers Act.
17. Western Colorado Congress (Grand Junction, CO): Greater Dominguez Canyon Wilderness Campaign to permanently protect 160,000 acres of public land in west-central Colorado.

HYBRID.PEDAL BIKE TOUR PROMOTES CONSERVATION EN ROUTE TO SALT LAKE CITY

Hybrid.Pedal, a bike tour organized by The Conservation Alliance and KEEN, Inc., is raising awareness about conservation projects as is follows a route from Portland, OR to Salt Lake City. The tour will end in Salt Lake on Tuesday, August 7 with a celebration of Utah Wilderness at the downtown Gallivan Center.

The Hybrid.Pedal route connects the dots of places Conservation Alliance funding is working to protect, or has already saved. The Conservation Alliance grantees leading the effort to save these special wildlands are working with the riders to organize events as the tour passes through their communities.

“Hybrid.Pedal is a rolling celebration of the efforts to protect our wildlands and rivers for their habitat and recreational values,” said John Sterling, Executive Director of The Conservation Alliance. “The Alliance supports the most effective conservation organizations in North America, and each of these groups is fighting to save special places in their backyards.”

Alliance grantee Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance is planning a warm Salt Lake welcome for the tour with the “Utah Wilderness Day” celebration at the Gallivan Center. Utah Governor John Huntsman and Salt Lake Mayor Rocky Anderson will be on hand to congratulate the riders. The welcome will be followed by a concert by musician Greg Brown. (For more information see www.suwa.org).

The tour kicked off in Portland on July 25 with a ride to the flanks of Mount Hood, where Oregon Wild, an Alliance grantee, is working to protect 125,000 acres of Wilderness. Coincidentally, just as the riders ended their first leg on the mountain, a US Senate committee voted unanimously to support Wilderness legislation for the areas.

Riders then rolled through Central Oregon where they partnered with Alliance working to protect The Badlands and Skyline Forest, two separate wildlands near Bend, OR. Before leaving Oregon, the group visited Steens Mountain, a desert gem whose protection was spearheaded by Alliance grantee Oregon Natural Desert Association in 2001.

Hybrid.Pedal will visit the North Fork Payette River and the Boulder-White Clouds Mountains in Idaho before heading south to Logan Canyon in Utah. The Payette was saved from a proposed dam in the early 1990s by an Alliance grantee that eventually became Idaho Rivers United. Idaho Conservation League is currently using Alliance support in its effort to protect the Boulder-White Clouds as Wilderness. Grantee Winter Wildlands Alliance has worked doggedly to establish a nonmotorized winter recreation area in Logan Canyon.

“The diversity of projects along the route is stunning, but the common thread is the deep passion local people hold for these special places,” said Sterling. “Hybrid.Pedal provides a link to that passion.”

KEEN, Inc. is producing a documentary film about the ride which will premiere at the Outdoor Retailer trade show on August 10. The riders are also producing a blog about the tour at http://hybridpedal.blogspot.com/.

 

ADVENTURER TO DISCUSS IMPACTS OF GLOBAL WARMING ON THE ARCTIC AT THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE BREAKFAST

National Geographic Adventurer Jonathan Waterman will be the featured speaker at The Conservation Alliance Breakfast on Friday, August 10, 7:30-9:00 AM at the Salt Lake City Marriott. Waterman’s talk, Arctic Warming, will focus on the impacts global warming is having on the Arctic environment.

Waterman, who has explored the Arctic 18 times over the past two decades, recently visited the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge with famed biologist George Schaller. Together, Waterman and Schaller surveyed the impacts global warming on the region. The expedition discovered melting permafrost, unnatural predation of nesting birds, brushed-over tundra, disappearing glaciers, and dying forests.

“Global warming is the defining environmental challenge of our time,” said John Sterling, Executive Director of The Conservation Alliance. “It is important that we look at the impacts this crisis is having on our special wild places. We are lucky that Jon Waterman has made the effort to quantify global warming’s effect on the Arctic.”

Waterman’s story-presentation explains global warming with objectivity and scientific credibility, as well as sharing his journey trekking, rafting, and solo kayaking through the Arctic Refuge. He meets bears, Inupait hunters, and caribou and conveys his experiences with artful still photography.

“The Conservation Alliance has made major financial contributions to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from oil development,” said Sterling. “Now the region faces a much more challenging threat.”

Prior to Waterman’s talk, The Conservation Alliance will provide a summary of the $350,000 in grants the organization made in April. The Alliance will also recognize the companies that have joined the organization since the January OR Show.

“The Conservation Alliance continues to grow in size and effectiveness,” said Sterling. “We just completed our largest funding cycle ever, and have added ten new member companies since January .”

The Conservation Alliance Breakfast is open to the public. The Alliance will serve a continental breakfast at 7:30 AM, and the program starts promptly at 8:00 AM.

EASTERN MOUNTAIN SPORTS SALE BENEFITS THE CONSERVATION ALLIANCE

Eastern Mountain Sports raised more than $16,000 for The Conservation Alliance during the retailer’s Upgrade Your Gear sale event held April 20-22.

The company pledged to share 1 percent of sales equally between the Alliance and The Access Fund. Each of the 67 Eastern Mountain Sports stores participated in the promotion, raising a total of $32,387, half of which will go to the Alliance’s effort to preserve North America’s wildlands and rivers for their habitat and recreational values.

“Eastern Mountain Sports is happy to give back to the places we play and live, and to be an active participant in the conservation of our wildlands,” said Will Manzer, President and CEO of Eastern Mountain Sports. “The Conservation Alliance has a long history of supporting effective conservation initiatives, and we’re pleased to be in a position to partner in that important work.”

An active member of The Conservation Alliance since 1997, Eastern Mountain Sports wanted to go beyond annual membership dues to demonstrate a greater commitment to conservation.

“We are grateful to Eastern Mountain Sports for taking the initiative to draw their customers into our conservation efforts,” said John Sterling, Executive Director of The Conservation Alliance. “The sale not only generated valuable funds for the Alliance, but gave Eastern Mountain Sports customers the opportunity to learn more about our work.”

The Conservation Alliance has contributed more than $600,000 to conservation projects in the Northeastern US, where most Eastern Mountain Sports stores are located.

CONSERVATION ALLIANCE TESTIFIES FOR MOUNT HOOD WILDERNESS

Conservation Alliance Executive Director John Sterling testified at a Senate hearing today in support of legislation that would protect wilderness and wild rivers on Oregon’s iconic Mount Hood.

The Lewis and Clark Mount Hood Wilderness Act, introduced by Oregon Senators Ron Wyden and Gordon Smith, would designate 128,000 acres of land on the Mount Hood National Forest as Wilderness. It would also secure Wild and Scenic designations for 80 miles of rivers on the mountain. In addition, the legislation would establish a 35,000-acre National Recreation Area.

“The Conservation Alliance supports the effort to secure new Wilderness designations on Mount Hood because wilderness is good for business,” said Sterling in his testimony. “Our protected wilderness and rivers are among our most valuable economic assets.”

Several outdoor industry companies have actively supported the effort to protect wild places on Mount Hood. In 2006, representatives from Columbia Sportswear, KEEN Footwear, and Yakima Products met with both Senators’ offices to express their support for new protections. The Conservation Alliance has submitted supportive comments at several hearings dating back to 2004.

“This hearing is the latest in a string of efforts we have made to demonstrate support for Mount Hood’s wilderness and rivers,” said Sterling. “Our members in Oregon and elsewhere are committed to preserving the mountain’s natural heritage.”

KEEN Footwear moved their operations to Oregon recently, in part because of the region’s high quality of life. The company now employs more than 60 people in downtown Portland.

“Easy access to protected public lands is an important asset to living in the Portland area,” said KEEN President Kirk Richardson. “It helps us recruit and retain good employees. Adding new wilderness and river protections on Mount Hood is good for Oregon, and good for our company.”

During the hearing, both Senators Wyden and Smith pledged to work hard to ensure that their bill passes this year. Sterling encouraged the Senators to consider Mount Hood the first in a series of efforts to protect Oregon’s special public lands.

“You can count on it!” responded Wyden.

  • Archives
    • 2017
    • 2016
    • 2015
    • 2014
    • 2013
    • 2012
    • 2011
    • 2010
    • 2009
    • 2008
    • 2007
    • 2006